Incorporated in 1986, the Galveston Arts Center (GAC) is an independent nonprofit organization that showcases innovative contemporary art.

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Galveston Arts Center
Previous Exhibits

May 29-July 4, 2010
Sharon Joines
Wharton County: This Alluvil Land


Sharon Joines
Cattle at Water Trough, Iago,
Texas
 (detail), 2011
Archival Inkjet Print
16 x 20 inches
Courtesy the artist

A native of Houston, Sharon Joines moved to Wharton in 1973 and has photographed the changes Wharton County has gone through since 2004. Located 60 miles southwest of Houston, Wharton was home to playwright Horton Foote and still boasts the iconic Tee Pee Motel. While the ravages of weather and time have taken their toll, Joines writes that she has developed a deep love and respect for the place, its history and its people.

“The true character of a place does not fully reveal itself until a relationship is built,” notes Joines. “The images I am making are a testimony to what I have come to believe make life in a small town unique. The experience has proven to be both liberating and full of lessons.” Joines’ images reflect her interest in the impetus for people to continue to want to live in Wharton County rather than moving to a more economically prosperous area. 


Photo Captions: 
Scott Dalton
Car Bomb, Ciudad Juarez, 2010
Archival Inkjet Print
24 x 20 inches
Courtesy the artist
Sharon Joines
Wharton County: This Alluvil Land

In stark contrast to Joines’ idyllic scenes of bucolic country life are the compelling images of what constitutes daily life for residents in the Texas-Mexico border town of Ciudad Juarez, by filmmaker and photographer Scott Dalton. Dalton spent 14 years working throughout Latin America documenting civil conflict and the continually escalating drug war. Thought to be the war’s epicenter, Ciudad Juarez sits across from El Paso and has been called “Murder City” and “Baghdad on the Border” due to the over 3,000 murders per year on average. Dalton writes, “I am interested in the often fragile relationship between people and the places they live—in how individuals, environment, and history combine to create a region with its own culture…. In ‘So Close, So Far’ I am exploring these ideas through images of daily life in a place where the drug war calls the very concept of ‘daily life’ into question.” Through his combination of documentary reporting and environmental portraiture, Dalton records the tragic history of a city where cartel violence is forging an uncertain new reality. His vision is fresh, original and probing.

Sharon Joines

Scott Dalton